Who am I? (11)

2018-10-31
Ephesians 4:15 NIV

Whether we’re a reformer, server, achiever, artist, thinker, loyalist, enthusiast, commander, or peacemaker, we all wrestle with sin. And knowing that each personality type has its own hidden temptations, helps us to be less envious of others when we’re not doing well, and less likely to judge them when we are. Recognising our particular pattern sin lets us know what we need to work on. For example, if we’re a reformer we need to be aware of our tendency towards self-righteousness. However, it’s also important to recognise that we’ve been wired by God with a passion for justice – and that’s a good thing. There’s positives and negatives to every character. We’ll all have things we need to work on and things that help us do amazing work for God’s kingdom. And when we’re aware of other people’s patterns, it helps us to empathise and live in harmony with them. As we learn about their patterns we become more encouraging towards those whose sins are different from ours. For example, we can make sure ‘helpers’ don’t always get stuck in the ‘serving’ mode, and encourage ‘peacemakers’ to speak honestly when they’re angry. Our goal should be to take off our religious masks, strengthen one another in our areas of struggle, and do it in a gracious, non-judgmental way. When we know and accept ourselves and others, we can walk together in love. ‘Speaking the truth in love, we will in all things grow up.’ Only then are we free to become the best version of ourselves – God’s unique creation.

Deut 18:9-18; Dan 2; Isa 47:5-15; Acts 16:16-34

Your pattern sins (11)


Ephesians 4:15 NIV

Whether you are a reformer, a server, an achiever, an artist, a thinker, a loyalist, an enthusiast, a commander, or a peacemaker, every one of us wrestles with sin. And knowing that each category of sin has its own hidden temptations should make you less envious of others when you’re not doing well yourself, and less likely to judge them when you are. Recognizing your particular pattern sin lets you know what you need to work on. For example, if you’re a reformer you need to be aware of your tendency toward self-righteousness. However, it’s also important to recognize that you’ve been wired by God with a passion for justice – and that’s a good thing. Indeed, you’ll feel His presence most when you can express these things with freedom and love. Finally, knowing other people’s patterns helps you to empathize and live in harmony with them. As you learn about their patterns you become more patient with those whose sins are different from yours. For example, you can make sure “helpers” don’t always get stuck in the “serving” mode, and encourage “peacemakers” to speak honestly when they’re angry. Our goal should be to take off our religious masks, strengthen one another in our areas of struggle, and do it in a gracious, nonjudgmental way. When we know and accept ourselves and others, we can walk together in love. “Speaking the truth in love, we will in all things grow up.” Only then are we free to become the best version of ourselves – God’s hand-signed edition.

Soul food: Deut 18:9-18; Dan 2; Isa 47:5-15; Acts 16:16-34

Jou sondepatroon (11)


Efesiërs 4:15 NLV

Of jy nou hervormer, ‘n dienaar, ‘n presteerder, ‘n kunstenaar, ‘n denker, ‘n lojalis, ‘n entoesias, ‘n bevelvoerder, of ‘n vredemaker is, ons almal sukkel met sonde. Om te weet dat elke kategorie sy eie versteekte versoekings het, behoort jou minder jaloers op ander te maak wanneer dit nie met jou goed gaan nie en minder geneig om hulle te oordeel wanneer dit wel met jou goed gaan. Wanneer jy jou eie sondepatroon herken, laat dit jou toe om te weet waaraan jy moet werk. As jy byvoorbeeld ‘n hervormer is, moet jy van jou geneigdheid tot self-regverdiging bewus wees. Dis egter ook belangrik om te weet dat God jou met ‘n passie vir regverdigheid geskep het – en dat dit ‘n goeie eienskap is. Jy sal inderdaad sy teenwoordigheid die meeste voel wanneer jy hierdie eienskap in vryheid en liefde kan uitdruk. Om ander mense se patrone te ken, help jou ook om met hulle te empatiseer en in harmonie met hulle saam te leef. Soos jy hulle patrone leer ken, word jy meer geduldig met diegene wie se sondes verskillend van joune is. Jy kan byvoorbeeld seker maak dat dienaars nie altyd besig is om te dien nie en vredemakers aanmoedig om eerlik te wees wanneer hulle kwaad is. Ons doel moet wees om ons godsdienstige maskers af te haal, mekaar in areas van swakheid te versterk en dit op ‘n genadige, onveroordelende manier te doen. Wanneer ons onsself en ander ken en aanvaar, kan ons saam in liefde stap. ‘Nee, terwyl ons mekaar liefhet, sal ons by die waarheid bly en so in alle opsigte groei om soos Christus te wees…’ Eers dan sal ons vry wees om die beste weergawes van onsself te word – die weergawe wat God jou geskep het om te wees.

Sielskos: Deut 18:9-18; Dan 2; Jes 47:5-15; Hand 16:16-34

Who am I? (10)

2018-10-30
Ephesians 4:25 NIVUK

Peacemakers: Peacemakers thrive when life is calm. They love the verse: ‘How good and pleasant it is when brothers live together in unity’ (Psalm 133:1 NIV). They make excellent counsellors and mediators, and can usually bring reconciliation to families, neighbourhoods, and workplaces. Peace is an excellent thing to work for. It’s one of the fruits of the Spirit (have a look at Galatians 5:22-23) and Jesus even said ‘Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God’ (Matthew 5:9 NIV). Abraham is a great illustration of a peacemaker. When he and his nephew Lot began to prosper, a feud broke out between their herdsmen because the land was too small to accommodate all their cattle. Realising it could split the family, Abraham took action, dealt with the problem, and saved the relationship. But sometimes peacemakers are inclined to seek peace at any price, use their relational skills to blend in, and avoid taking the initiative or taking risks because they like comfort and security. As peacemakers, we can suffer from ‘terminal niceness’ when courage is what’s really required from us in a situation. We shouldn’t let fear of conflict, or the desire for everything to be peaceful, get in the way of speaking the truth. When someone has hurt us, we don’t have to keep quiet. We can speak the truth, but in a kind and non-confrontational way. Keeping the peace doesn’t mean never speaking up for ourselves. The Bible says: ‘Speak truthfully to your neighbour, for we are all members of one body.’ We need to have integrity. Even if we’ve got good intentions, we need to be acting in a moral and truthful way.

Isa 26-29; John 7:1-13; Ps 114; Prov 28:1-4

Your pattern sins (10)


Ephesians 4:25 NKJV

Peacemakers: Peacemakers thrive when life is calm. They love the verse: “How good and pleasant it is when brothers live together in unity” (Psalm 133:1 NIV). They make excellent therapists and mediators, and can usually bring reconciliation to families, neighborhoods, and workplaces. But sometimes they’re inclined to seek peace at any price, use their relational skills to blend in, and avoid taking the initiative or assuming risks because of their undue attachment to comfort and security. They often suffer from “terminal niceness” when courage is what’s really required. Abraham is a great illustration of a peacemaker. When he and his nephew Lot began to prosper, a feud broke out between their herdsmen because the land was too small to accommodate all their cattle. Realizing it could split the family, Abraham took action, dealt with the problem, and saved the relationship. On the other hand, when King Abimelech saw Abraham’s wife, Sarah, and wanted to make her part of his harem, Abraham, fearing for his life, acted like a coward and said, “She is my sister” (Genesis 20:2 NIV). It’s critical to recognize your pattern sins so you can deal with them effectively. Jesus warned about those who go around taking specks out of other people’s eyes, while failing to notice the “log” in their own (See Matthew 7:3). Your pattern sin is so appealing that it’s your biggest danger, and it’s so close to you that you’re apt not to see it. David prayed, “Cleanse…me from secret faults. Keep…thy servant also from presumptuous sins; let them not have dominion over me” (Psalm 19:12-13 KJV).

Soul food: Isa 26-29; John 7:1-13; Ps 114; Prov 28:1-4