Have you prayed about it?

2021-02-20
2 Corinthians 4:18 NLT

God hasn’t made prayer difficult or complicated, but really simple. The truth is, many of us pray more often than we know. And we have a more effective and successful prayer life than we realize. The trouble is, we don’t always recognize when we’re praying. That’s because we’ve gotten the wrong idea about it. We’ve been taught that prayer requires a specific environment like church, or a prescribed posture like kneeling, or a particular form of words like “Thee” and “Thou,” and that we must strictly adhere to certain religious rituals.

No, prayer is simply talking to God, then being still and allowing Him to talk to you. You can pray any time, anywhere, about anything, by just directing your thoughts, spoken and unspoken, toward God.

Paul writes, “We fix our gaze on things that cannot be seen. For the things we see now will soon be gone, but the things we cannot see will last forever.” Imagine that all of God’s blessings and benefits are stored in a giant warehouse in the invisible realm; things like forgiveness, strength, wisdom, guidance, favour, and resources. Through prayer you enter God’s warehouse of blessings, and by faith you receive them and bring them back into your life.

The Bible says you have not because you ask not (See James 4:2). So whatever you need today, pray and ask God for it – believing that He will give it to you. Jesus said, “If you remain in me and my words remain in you, you may ask for anything you want, and it will be granted” (John 15:7 NLT). So, have you prayed about it?

Soul food: Gen 10-12; Matt 16:13-28; Ps 36; Prov 5:21-23

Simply pray


2 Corinthians 4:18 NLT

God hasn’t made prayer difficult or complicated. Prayer is actually really simple. The truth is, we probably pray more often than we realise. The trouble is, we don’t always recognise when we’re praying, because we can get the wrong idea about it. We might have been taught that prayer needs a specific place or environment like a church, or a certain posture like kneeling with head bowed and eyes closed, or a particular form of words like ‘Thee’ and ‘Thou’, or that we must stick to certain religious rituals when we pray. These things aren’t necessarily wrong, but we don’t need to do them for God to listen to us.

Prayer is simply talking to Him, in a way that feels comfortable and natural to us, then being still and allowing Him to talk to us. We can pray anytime, anywhere, about anything, silently or aloud, just by directing our thoughts towards Him.

Paul wrote, ‘We fix our gaze on things that cannot be seen. For the things we see now will soon be gone, but the things we cannot see will last forever.’ Imagine that all of God’s blessings and benefits are stored in a giant warehouse in the invisible realm; things like forgiveness, strength, wisdom, guidance, favour, and resources. Through prayer we enter God’s warehouse of blessings, and by faith we receive them and bring them back into our lives. Jesus said, ‘If you remain in me and my words remain in you, you may ask for anything you want, and it will be granted’ (John 15:7 NLT).

So whatever you need today, pray and ask God for it, believing that He will give it to you.

Gen 10-12; Matt 16:13-28; Ps 36; Prov 5:21-23

Slow down! (1)

2020-11-28
Philippians 3:13 NLT

We live in the day of multitasking. We talk on the phone, apply makeup, drink coffee, eat lunch, feed the kids, and even read text messages while barreling down the highway. Dr. Richard Swenson says: “In some instances we are more productive…some people crochet while watching the news. And in certain jobs it’s considered necessary; clerks on the Stock Exchange floor are required to run around doing five things at once. But isn’t it bizarre that when a 48-year-old broker drops dead, his colleagues keep working around the lifeless body receiving CPR?

The dramatic escalation of busyness has given us too much to do in a short time. The standard strategy…instead of refusing to take on more…is to do two, three, or four things at once. It’s an extension of the do-more-and-more-with-less-and-less philosophy. But someone forgot to do the math! By doing two things at once you divert 30 percent of your attention from the primary task; you sacrifice quality for quantity, which leads to more errors. You may end up finishing more tasks, but with poorer products and frazzled nerves. The downside of multitasking isn’t well-advertised…so we keep experimenting to see how far we can push the envelope.

However, when it comes to relationships, multitasking can be disastrous. We don’t listen…it takes too much time. Families need focus…babies need what they need when they need it. You either parent them or you don’t.

Paul didn’t live like that. He focused ‘on…one thing,’ which was the person in front of him.” A dog has four feet, but it doesn’t try to walk down four roads! So slow down and establish a pace that’s sane and sustainable.

Soul food: 2 Chr 32-34; John 14:15-25; Ps 118:19-29; Prov 28:5-8

Learning from Moses (1)

2020-10-24
Hebrews 11:24 NIV

The life of Moses can teach us many things about what it means to live a life that’s successful in God’s eyes. Over the next few days, we’ll be taking a look at some of them.

First: you must know who you are. ‘Moses, when he had grown up, refused to be known as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter.’ Moses was born a Hebrew, but he was raised as an Egyptian by Pharaoh’s daughter. Even though he was being trained and prepared to be second-in-command in Pharaoh’s kingdom, Moses knew God had called him to free his people and lead them out of Egypt.

Moses had every comfort he could wish for in the palace, and he could have stayed there, but he knew that working for Pharaoh wasn’t who he was meant to be. Moses made the right choice to follow God’s purpose for him, but it also meant spending the next eighty years of his life in the desert.

Every one of us must come to grips with our identity. We all have a deep need and desire to accept who we are. Accepting our God-given identity isn’t always easy, but trying to be who we’re not is stressful and puts us under immense pressure. Moses recognised this, and decided to stop pretending.

Choosing to accept God’s plan for our life frees us from the burden of pretending, and releases us into the unique identity and purpose God’s given us.

If Moses had stayed in Pharaoh’s court, we might only remember him as an Egyptian mummy in a museum, or maybe not at all. But he made the right decision, and from an eternal perspective, it was the best one.

Hab 1-3; John 6:25-34; Ps 98; Prov 24:15-18

You’re in God’s waiting room (2)

2020-07-09
Psalm 27:14 KJV

God gave His people an interesting command: “Three times a year all your men are to appear before the Sovereign Lord, the God of Israel. I will drive out nations before you and enlarge your territory, and no one will covet your land when you go up three times each year to appear before the Lord” (Exodus 34:23-24 NIV). Imagine that! Three times a year they were to stop working and spend time with the Lord worshiping Him, seeking His guidance, and getting direction for the future. Can you imagine what would happen if you did that? Note the words “I will enlarge your territory.” Instead of losing – you’ll gain, and instead of going backward – you’ll go forward. Note also the words “I will drive out the nations before you.” While you worship God and wait on Him, He will fight your battles. And the difference between you and God is that you risk losing, but He’s never lost a battle. Note also the words “No one will covet your land.” You don’t have to worry about the competition getting ahead of you. God used this three-times-a-year pilgrimage to teach His people this principle: “If you wait on Me in worship, I will work on your behalf.” His Word says, “Those who wait on the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint” (Isaiah 40:31 NKJV). So here are your choices: Keep stressing out, or draw the strength and strategy you need from God by spending time with Him.

Soul food: Jer 36:27-40:16; Luke 6:17-26; Ps 79; Prov 15:18-21